Johnnie Woka and walking to early death, in style

21Feb 2016
Michael Eneza
Guardian On Sunday
Johnnie Woka and walking to early death, in style

ANOTHER city artiste lost his life lately when repairing a car, in what would otherwise look like a routine bad accident, and generally that is what was perceptible, until one started to look a bit closely at photos of the late artiste.

Johnnie Woka

Here there were tell tale images leading one to suspect the worst, that his death was cast in ritual, a sort of human sacrifice that artistes and others often make of their own lives, seeking to attain fame and notoriety. There are forces in this expansive world which can assist in that direction, and their price is unflinching, that it is to contribute uniquely to their work, and first by offering blood.

Someone was explaining that they often know what they will be doing once they leave the world, that they would shift from a state of being famous themselves to a situation where they would now be at the service of artistes they left in the world. Similar to themselves, they would be assisted to become rich and famous on precisely the same terms, in which case one sees a cycle of artistes demanding being looked after by artistes who came earlier than themselves. It is a situation where a youthful artiste leaves the world for the one beyond, meeting professional ancestors, who were only lately colleagues,

What was telling about photos of the still yankish artiste in scarcely the mid20s as yet, was the manner for instance of writing the second pseudo-name he used, Woka, standing for Walker, the famous sword carrying figure attached to Scotch Whisky that became his hero worship trade mark. The pidgin version of the name was stitched together with crossed bones, a particularly revealing sign of the spiritual loyalties of the bearer of that sign. In which case building a case for comprehension, rather than actually to explain, the death as it occurred. With crossed bones as spiritual insignia, one can die at any moment.

At times these situations are hidden and not meeting the eye in like manner as those who carry crossed bones signs around in T-shirts or colourful clothing of certain preachers, where one can clearly discern images of the beast. In the latter case one isn’t in a position to see but there are images that are more or less unmistakable, for instance a city preacher who has a habit of climbing on the backs of followers to be carried, and says this practice stems from the fact that Jesus was carried by a donkey. Yes, indeed and the human donkeys, who he says are church employees of his, are meant to resemble that donkey.

Trying to sort out head and tail about the messiah being carried by donkey and a pastor being carried in church looked a bit complicated, until one remembers that the white horse at the gate of the temple of Babylon is a better explanation of that habit. That is a figure of Lucifer as depicted by the goddess Ashteroth who takes various animal images depending on situations, of which three are particularly noticeable – the white horse of Babylon temple, the lioness to which Ashteroth is attached as an Assyrian goddess and the goat human appearing to Freemasons as the Sabbatic Goat. All is Lucifer.

There is another exchange lately among artistes and an accessory event which illustrated a spiritualist situation among the partisans of the dispute. It was announced that Wema Sepetu was pregnant, and a multi-decorated Nay wa Mitego declared that it was hard for him to believe that the news was true, or that she would never have a baby, etc. Soon enough, within a space of a week or ten days, social media outlets and then newspaper readers heard that the pregnancy had collapsed – and Nay had won the debate. But what was that in reality, unless one stops to remember that infants are especially vital raw materials in occult operations, raised beyond the earth’s immediate sky far upwards to a zone with ultra-violet rays, and special rays from the sun deity up there, to dissolve the baby into vital oil to fly?

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