SADC calls for sustainable management of natural resources for benefit

23Oct 2019
Correspondent
Arusha
The Guardian
SADC calls for sustainable management of natural resources for benefit

THE Southern African Development Community (SADC) is assessing its position in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) aiming to maximise the benefits derived from the region.

Prof Adolf Mkenda

“Management of environment and natural resources is key to ensure countries continue to benefit from their resources,” said  Permanent Secretary in the ministry of natural resources and tourism Prof Adolf Mkenda when addressing the meeting of SADC senior officials responsible for environment, natural resources and tourism in Arusha on Monday.

Prof Mkenda who is the SADC Chair of the committee of senior officials responsible for environment, natural resources and tourism said since the region is rich in natural resources in various forms such ad forest, fish and wild animals it has to benefit from them.

According to him, the resources are posed to contribute to the development of the region, mainly improvement of the tourism industry and food security.

“We should therefore take measures to contain environmental crimes and no one should be allowed to stop us from achieving this goal. It is time for unity and solidarity against environmental crimes,” he said.

Prof Mkenda added that unity among SADC members is the main pillar in addressing environmental crimes. He said that support from partners including the international community is also crucial.

Meanwhile the PS insisted on the region to take immediate and decisive actions to address recent cyclone events (Idai and Kenneth) in order to maintain economic development of the countries as well as securing people’s lives.

Earlier, the Director of Food Agriculture and Natural Resources from SADC Secretariat, Domingos Gove said the objectives of SADC as in Treaty, includes to promote sustainable and equitable economic growth and socio-economic development that will ensure poverty alleviation with the ultimate objective of its eradication, enhance the standard and quality of life of the people and support the socially disadvantaged through regional integration.

Gove said treaty also calls for the sustainable management of natural resources and effective protection of the environment.

Resources shared between SADC member states include Lake Tanganyika whose shores straddle Zambia, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Zambezi River whose tributaries meander across Zambia, Angola, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

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