What political parties need in 2020 elections

04Nov 2018
Crispin Gerald
Dar es Salaam
Guardian On Sunday
What political parties need in 2020 elections

ACCORD- Tanzania need dialogues and discussions that seek to promote a peaceful environment and space for effective participation in an election among political parties

maalim seif, cuf genetal secretary

TIME flies fast, and as about a year and a half remain to election time, political parties are being advised to hold roundtable discussions to reach mutual consensus.

Resident Country Director of the International Republican Institute (IRI) Peter Aling’o said in Dar es Salaam this week that mutual consensus was key to holding fruitful elections.

He made the observation at a session on the role of civil society organizations (CSOs) and the media in political and electoral reforms agenda that was jointly organized by IRI and USAID.

Aling’o said they would like to see dialogue and discussion that seek to promote a peaceful environment and space for effective participation in an election among political parties take root in the country.

“Political parties have the responsibility to show the direction in handling elections in a peaceful manner through dialogue,” he said.

According to him, the institute was currently engaging actors to bring some improvement to the political environment towards the country’s 2020 general elections.

“The idea is to work with Tanzanians in supporting them to reflect on the challenges they encounter during election and come up with solutions,” he said.

“We want political parties to make improvements in their internal structures, systems and mechanisms,” he said.

The director of advocacy and reforms at the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) Fulgence Massawe said on the sidelines of the session that plans were underway to run a voter education campaign aimed at improving the legal electoral framework.

“Experience in previous elections shows low numbers of voters, specifically the youth,” he said.

“We need to prepare the youth on a legal framework for them to vote during elections,” he added.

Massawe said the government needs to work on the recommendations given by election observers in addressing various implications in past elections.

A lecturer in the department of sociology at the University of Dar es Salaam, Dr Richard Sambaiga, said reforms need first to start within political parties themselves.

“Political parties need to look at their internal structures and design a capacity building package to strengthen service delivery,” he said.

“Resources, in my views, are not limited to financial resources. They could also be social capital, networks, actors, networking, men and people in the private sector,” he said.

ACCORD- Tanzania need dialogues and discussions that seek to promote a peaceful environment and space for effective participation in an election among political parties

By Correspondent Crispin Gerald

TIME flies fast, and as about a year and a half remain to election time, political parties are being advised to hold roundtable discussions to reach mutual consensus.

Resident Country Director of the International Republican Institute (IRI) Peter Aling’o said in Dar es Salaam this week that mutual consensus was key to holding fruitful elections.

He made the observation at a session on the role of civil society organizations (CSOs) and the media in political and electoral reforms agenda that was jointly organized by IRI and USAID.

Aling’o said they would like to see dialogue and discussion that seek to promote a peaceful environment and space for effective participation in an election among political parties take root in the country.

“Political parties have the responsibility to show the direction in handling elections in a peaceful manner through dialogue,” he said.

According to him, the institute was currently engaging actors to bring some improvement to the political environment towards the country’s 2020 general elections.

“The idea is to work with Tanzanians in supporting them to reflect on the challenges they encounter during election and come up with solutions,” he said.

“We want political parties to make improvements in their internal structures, systems and mechanisms,” he said.

The director of advocacy and reforms at the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) Fulgence Massawe said on the sidelines of the session that plans were underway to run a voter education campaign aimed at improving the legal electoral framework.

“Experience in previous elections shows low numbers of voters, specifically the youth,” he said.

“We need to prepare the youth on a legal framework for them to vote during elections,” he added.

Massawe said the government needs to work on the recommendations given by election observers in addressing various implications in past elections.

A lecturer in the department of sociology at the University of Dar es Salaam, Dr Richard Sambaiga, said reforms need first to start within political parties themselves.

“Political parties need to look at their internal structures and design a capacity building package to strengthen service delivery,” he said.

“Resources, in my views, are not limited to financial resources. They could also be social capital, networks, actors, networking, men and people in the private sector,” he said.

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