Govt spent 93.8bn/- to improve infrastructure for 588 schools

23May 2019
Polycarp Machira
DODOMA
The Guardian
Govt spent 93.8bn/- to improve infrastructure for 588 schools

THE government had spent 93.8bn/- to improve infrastructure for 588 schools in the 2018/19, 303 being primary schools and 285 secondary, the House heard yesterday.

Deputy minister for Education, Science, Technology and Vocational Training, William Ole Nasha.

Deputy minister for Education, Science, Technology and Vocational Training, William Ole Nasha told the law makers that the amount was spent on building some 1,190 classrooms, 222 dormitories, 2,141 toilets, 76 halls and 99 houses.

He noted that the government will continue distributing learning materials including laboratory equipment and other learning aids for students with special needs, adding that between 2017 and April 2019, the government has employed 17,884 teachers.

He was responding to a question asked by the Bumbwini MP, Muhamed Amour Muhammed (CUF) who had wanted to know what the government is doing to improve education in the country.

He argued that results of the national form four examinations are always bad due to poor learning and teaching environment. “What is the government is the government planning to do to rescue the situation?” he questioned.

In response, the deputy minister said the government will continue improving the competence of the education system, noting that it has bought 45 vehicles for quality assurance officers and some 2,897 motorcycles for education officers.

“In the 2019/20, the government plans to build 100 offices for quality assurance officers and employ more workers in the effort to improve quality of education in the country” said the deputy minister.

He also told the parliament that pass rate in the form four national examinations has been on the increase every year from 67.91 percent in 2015, 70.35 percent in 2016, 77.09 percent in 2017 and 78.36 percent in 2018.

Meanwhile, the government is contemplating having a common regulation and syllabus for the Tanzania mainland and Isles.

The deputy minister said this while responding to a supplementary question by the Special Seats MP, Najma Murtaza Giga (CCM) who had wondered why the government does not consider having common education regulations and syllabus in both parts of the country.

“ Why is it difficult to have common education regulations and syllabus in both parts of the union?” she asked, adding that by so doing, it will help save Zanzibar schools from appearing in the bottom ten category in the nationals examination’s ranking.

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